Expedition

Follow our explorers on expeditions around the world, and experience these far-flung places through our eyes.

Crossing the Himalayas, The Roof of the World

Justin Lichter and Shawn Forry set off to hike the length of the Himalayas from the easternmost 8,000 meter peak in the world, Kanchenjunga, to the westernmost 8,000 meter peak, Nanga Parbat. The ambitious traverse spanned an approximate distance of 2,500 miles and it took three months for the hikers to successfully make their way out of the highest mountain range in the world. This is their story.

The Seventh Summit: Carstensz Pyramid

Professional mountain guide and polar explorer, Ryan Waters, travels by helicopter over dense Indonesian jungle to reach base camp at the Seventh Summit, Carstensz Pyramid. Waters and his team then employ trusted climbing equipment and sharpened techniques to make a difficult traverse, and eventually reach the summit of the rugged, 16,024-foot mountain.

Long-Distance Ultralight Hiking

Justin Lichter, a.k.a. “Trauma”, has hiked over twenty thousand miles during the past eight years. Trauma brings only the essential gear along with him on the trail, and most if not all of those items end up doing double-duty. Learn more about how an ultralight approach to hiking has allowed him to cover huge distances while also making the most out of his time on the trail.

Light & Rugged Gear is Key to Expedition Success

Polar Explorer Eric Larsen shares his decision making process when it comes to evaluating the equipment he uses during his lengthy expeditions. Several key factors come into play when he decides what gear ‘makes the cut’, including weight and durability.

Expedition Fitness Training

Eric Larsen shares the importance of pre-expedition fitness training. He describes his routine, what it takes physically to endure polar expeditions, and how he prepared for climbing Mt. Everest. Also, Larsen explains how proper physical training beforehand helps to avoid problems during the expedition. Learn more about how Eric Larsen stays in shape after the jump.

Surviving the Antarctic Chill

I awoke to discover that blowing snow had drifted violently against the tent’s vestibule during the night, nearly smashing our pot and stove. I had to repeatedly punch the hard-packed drift loose just to open the flap. I was groggy from a fitful night’s sleep, during which I had been haunted by strange dreams. The loud train I imagined must have been a subconscious interpretation of the wind pounding against the thin nylon. It’s the first morning of my 2009 South Pole expedition in Antarctica, the beginning of my Save the Poles Expedition—a first-ever journey to the South Pole, North[...]