Contributions by John Rawlings

Diving the Shipwrecks of Vancouver Island, Canada

There is nothing quite like the thrill of seeing the ghostly image of a shipwreck appearing out of the gloom in deep, dark water. The Canadian Province of British Columbia, as beautifully gorgeous underwater as it is on land, has some of the finest coldwater shipwreck diving in the world. Providing a unique blend of history and a modern day adventure, AtlasOmega’s Calvin Tang and John Rawlings describe their dives on three of the Province’s shipwrecks with a select team of technical divers.

The Search for Deep Cold-Water Corals

Mention the word “coral” and most people will conjure up an image of tropical reefs, bathed in the bright sun and covered with a huge variety of corals in gin-clear turquoise water. Few realize that most corals actually dwell in cold, deep water far from the sun.

Underwater Exploration: Prince Rupert, Canada

All was silent except the soft lapping of the waves against the hull and the sound of my steady breathing into my Closed-Circuit Rebreather. Earlier we had asked about this site and had received the exciting answer, “As far as we know, no one’s ever dived it…”

OLED Shearwater Predator Dive Computer Review

An in-depth look at the industry-leading technical dive computer made by Shearwater Research. The “Predator” dive computer comes with an advanced OLED display, is depth rated to 450 feet, employs an intuitive user interface and can be used with any combination of oxygen, nitrogen and helium.

Lighten Up with Ultralight Buoyancy Arms

A key to producing beautiful underwater photos is to mount strobes far away from the lens to avoid “backscatter” (light bouncing off of particulate matter between you and the subject). Underwater photographers depend on strobe arms to do this. This set from Ultralight also helps with the camera’s buoyancy.

The Giant Pacific Octopus

Midway through the dive I saw what we were hoping to find – a small opening in the rock face with a trail of crab and clam debris falling away from it like an expanding fan. Pausing by the opening of the den, my light briefly danced around the interior – someone was home! A large, rectangular eye surrounded by a dense tangle of suckers and arms peered back at me, the large mantle moving in and out with each breath.
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Editor - John is an accomplished writer, technical diver and underwater photographer.